Posts tagged fishing

jann 9

Boulder CU welcome ! Hands Up Don’t Shoot! Cops

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Boulder is a pretty safe place; if you are rich and white. It gets less safe if you are Latino or African American. As long as you look, talk and walk white you should be fine here. But the cops are going to watch you.

If you look hip hop and all gangster, all eyes will be on you where ever you go.
If you are Asian, you are less suspect. Try to look like a nerd . If you are middle eastern try to look as American as you can. Many of you are rich, hang together, don’t drink and are fashionable. That goes a long way here. Goes without saying don’t wear hodgie clothes not matter if some white people do. They’re stupid and they don’t understand the implications… but the police do and Afgan and Iraqi war veterans who you will be going to school with don’t think hodgie clothes are cool. It makes them nervous and you suspect.

Most Strict sharia Muslims were thrown out of Boulder after 911. They FBI came to CU and revoked everyone’s passports. So don’t go grocery shopping at 1:00 am with your wife following behind you in a Birka. Dropped the Birka and any of that child or woman repressive civil rights stuff while you are in Boulder.

In all my years with my involvement with Police and  law enforcement one thought comes to mind. They do have the power, training, wherewithal and the guns to kill you at the drop of a hat. Like an explosive offensive lineman in football cops are like wild beasts ready to strike without warning. So you have to be mindful of that. You are not dealing with an ordinary person. You are always dealing with someone who can knock you to the ground, handcuff you and take away your freedom or your life. They are a gang of trained killers who live in a closed society. They are the military except on American soil. Our Military only operates on foreign soil  where the host country fears for their lives. Cops are color blind. They only see blue. They are a brotherhood of men and women who rule the streets.  They have rules of engagement which are less strict than our US Marine Corps.

That means if you frighten them them they can and will shoot to kill you.  They do not have much of an in between.

So I always approach cops with this in mind. I am not stupid.  I don’t ever do things to antagonize them. I never fight with them or argue with then.

They have the gun on their holster. They have the badge of authority and the entire police department, district attorneys office and local government behind them.

Cops are the wrong people to fuck with always.  Many of them are stressed and overworked. They spend much of the day dealing with scumbag wife beaters, child abusers, drug addicts and alcoholics, thieves etc.

So when they run up on you in a traffic stop just know you have a wilkd lion coming up to your car and you don’t want to piss him or her off.

What to do in a traffic stop.

1. Pull over to the right immediately and stop.

2. Don’t get out of the car.

3. Put your hands up on the steering wheel and keep them there.

4. If it is night , turn your overhead light on so the officer can see your hands.

5. Don’t go fishing around for your license or registration in the glove  box.

6. Sit still and wait for the cop to come to your window and wait for instructions.

7. Cops get nervous when you go to the glove box or start fishing around.  They worry that you might have a gun or someone in the car has a gun .

8. Be polite. Yes sir no sir goes a long way.  Don’t argue with him.

9 I have found that being polite to a police officer always helps….. If I have done something wrong  in the vehicle I just admit it or say i didn’t realize and apologize. That approach will get you less point on a ticket or a warning.  I almost never get stopped and when I do it is usually with a warning.

10. I am serious. I could have driven over the guys mother and he’ll give me a warning. Why. because I pose no threat.

12. Now of course I am white, middle aged and look like Rush Limbaugh so that helps… a lot. I am usually well dressed and well spoken. I don’t give off attitude.

13 I have no idea what to say to those of you who are black, Latino, or wear gangster clothes.  I would take my hat off and do your best Eddie Murphy impression.

14. when I was a long haired hippie and on drugs and wearing weird clothes… believe it or not I was the guy who was cool calm and collected around cops.  I was often the spokesperson. ” Yes sir. No problem here sir.  thank you sir . no sir yes sir. did you want to fuck one of the girls sir cause that one there thinks your cute.” I mean , I will do anything to keep the heat off and make sure the cops are feeling non threatened. I just try to be nice to them. Cause nobody else has been all day and they appreciate it.. And that means they will go find somebody else to eat.

15. If you have somebody with you who is being agro toward the cops, you tell that person to “shut the fuck up” in no uncertain terms. You tell the cop .. “You will have no problem with us sir, I am sorry for my disrespectful friend he was smoking crack before you so caringly stopped us ” and then you make sure a friend sits on that guy or girl.

16. Now you people of color, try to dress as white as you can. And talk as white as you can.  Wear Kakis and a blue oxford shirt and a red and blue stripped  tie. Talk about how you love the police and hope to be a police officer next year. Smile like Chris Rock and mention church. 

sorry that is how it goes.  This is a white mans world. White businessmen do rule…Next come our white women and our white children. If you are rich like me and live in a rich white city like Boulder you get treated like a Lord by the cops. Then again I don’t fuck up. I am not out dealing drugs, shooting people, robbing, stealing rapping or walking the streets. I am scared shitless.  But I get more points than you.

If you are black, Latino or homeless you will always be stopped by the cops in rich white Boulder or any affluent white neighborhood in America.

So how you carry yourself, what you wear and how you speak in the presence of law enforcement officers will make the difference of whether you live or die tonight.

Jann Scott has covered the police for over 20 years
by Jann Scott
Jann Scott’s Journal
from White Boulder
and now one of my favorite bands

 

 

pebble mine

EPA moves to protect Bristol Bay fishery from Pebble Mine

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Release Date: 02/28/2014
Contact Information: Hanady Kader, EPA Public Affairs, 206-553-0454, kader.hanady@epa.gov

Agency action begins process to prevent damage to world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery

(Washington, D.C.—Feb. 28, 2014) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is initiating a process under the Clean Water Act to identify appropriate options to protect the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery in Bristol Bay, Alaska from the potentially destructive impacts of the proposed Pebble Mine. The Pebble Mine has the potential to be one of the largest open pit copper mines ever developed and could threaten a salmon resource rare in its quality and productivity. During this process, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers cannot approve a permit for the mine. 

This action, requested by EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, reflects the unique nature of the Bristol Bay watershed as one of the world’s last prolific wild salmon resources and the threat posed by the Pebble deposit, a mine unprecedented in scope and scale. It does not reflect an EPA policy change in mine permitting. 

The Pebble Mine would be three times as large as the Kennecot mine pictured above

The Pebble Mine would be three times as large as the Kennecot mine pictured above

“Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “It’s why EPA is taking this step forward in our effort to ensure protection for the world’s most productive salmon fishery from the risks it faces from what could be one of the largest open pit mines on earth. This process is not something the Agency does very often, but Bristol Bay is an extraordinary and unique resource.”

The EPA is basing its action on available information, including data collected as a part of the agency’s Bristol Bay ecological risk assessment and mine plans submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission. Today, Dennis McLerran, EPA Regional Administrator for EPA Region 10, sent letters to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the State of Alaska, and the Pebble Partnership initiating action under EPA’s Clean Water Act Section 404(c) authorities.

“Bristol Bay is an extraordinary natural resource, home to some of the most abundant salmon producing rivers in the world. The area provides millions of dollars in jobs and food resources for Alaska Native Villages and commercial fishermen,” McLerran said. “The science EPA reviewed paints a clear picture: Large-scale copper mining of the Pebble deposit would likely result in significant and irreversible harm to the salmon and the people and industries that rely on them.”

Today’s action follows the January 2014 release of EPA’s “Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska,” a study that documents the significant ecological resources of the region and the potentially destructive impacts to salmon and other fish from potential large-scale copper mining of the Pebble Deposit. The assessment indicates that the proposed Pebble Mine would likely cause irreversible destruction of streams that support salmon and other important fish species, as well as extensive areas of wetlands, ponds and lakes. 

In 2010, several Bristol Bay Alaska Native tribes requested that EPA take action under Clean Water Act Section 404(c) to protect the Bristol Bay watershed and salmon resources from development of the proposed Pebble Mine, a venture backed by Northern Dynasty Minerals. The Bristol Bay watershed is home to 31 Alaska Native Villages. Residents of the area depend on salmon as a major food resource and for their economic livelihood, with nearly all residents participating in subsistence fishing. 

Bristol Bay produces nearly 50 percent of the world’s wild sockeye salmon with runs averaging 37.5 million fish each year. The salmon runs are highly productive due in large part to the exceptional water quality in streams and wetlands, which provide valuable salmon habitat. 

The Bristol Bay ecosystem generates hundreds of millions of dollars in economic activity and provides employment for over 14,000 full and part-time workers. The region supports all five species of Pacific salmon found in North America: sockeye, coho, Chinook, chum, and pink. In addition, it is home to more than 20 other fish species, 190 bird species, and more than 40 terrestrial mammal species, including bears, moose, and caribou. 

Based on information provided by The Pebble Partnership and Northern Dynasty Minerals, mining the Pebble deposit may involve excavation of a pit up to one mile deep and over 2.5 miles wide — the largest open pit ever constructed in North America. Disposal of mining waste may require construction of three or more massive earthen tailings dams as high as 650 feet. The Pebble deposit is located at the headwaters of Nushagak and Kvichak rivers, which produce about half of the sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay. 

The objective of the Clean Water Act is to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. The Act emphasizes protecting uses of the nation’s waterways, including fishing. 

The Clean Water Act generally requires a permit under Section 404 from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers before any person places dredge or fill material into wetlands, lakes and streams. Mining operations typically involve such activities and must obtain Clean Water Act Section 404 permits. Section 404 directs EPA to develop the environmental criteria the Army Corps uses to make permit decisions. It also authorizes EPA to prohibit or restrict fill activities if EPA determines such actions would have unacceptable adverse effects on fishery areas.

The steps in the Clean Water Act Section 404(c) review process are:

  • Step 1 – Consultation period with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and owners of the site, initiated today.
  • Step 2 – Publication of Proposed Determination, including proposed prohibitions or restrictions on mining the Pebble deposit, in Federal Register for public comment and one or more public hearings.
  • Step 3 – Review of public comments and development of Recommended Determination by EPA Regional Administrator to Assistant Administrator for Water at EPA Headquarters in Washington, DC.
  • Step 4 – Second consultation period with the Army Corps and site owners and development of Final Determination by Assistant Administrator for Water, including any final prohibitions or restrictions on mining the Pebble deposit.

Based on input EPA receives during any one of these steps, the agency could decide that further review under Section 404(c) is not necessary.

Now that the 404(c) process has been initiated, the Army Corps cannot issue a permit for fill in wetlands or streams associated with mining the Pebble deposit until EPA completes the 404(c) review process. 

EPA has received over 850,000 requests from citizens, tribes, Alaska Native corporations, commercial and sport fisherman, jewelry companies, seafood processors, restaurant owners, chefs, conservation organizations, members of the faith community, sport recreation business owners, elected officials and others asking EPA to take action to protect Bristol Bay.

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Another “sneak attack” on wildlife from GOP

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Disguised as “Sportsmen’s Heritage Act, ”Legislation Would Also Roll Back Public-lands Protection, Promote Polar Bear Trophy Hunting

 

WASHINGTON— The U.S. House of Representatives will vote Tuesday on H.R. 3590, the misnamed “Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act.” Under the guise of expanding hunting and fishing access on public lands, the Republican-supported bill aims to prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from protecting millions of birds and other animals from lead poisoning. The extremist legislation also contains provisions to undermine the Wilderness Act, dispense with environmental review for projects on national wildlife refuges, and promote polar bear hunting.

Lead poisoning from shotgun pellets still effects wildlife. Two years ago, a golden eagle that had nested in the Flatirons for several tears was found lead-poisoned on the NOAA/NIST grounds.

Lead poisoning from shotgun pellets still effects wildlife. Two years ago, a golden eagle that had nested in the Flatirons for several tears was found lead-poisoned on the NOAA/NIST grounds.

 

 

“Another cynical assault by House Republicans to roll back protections for public lands and wildlife,” said Bill Snape, senior counsel at the Center for Biological Diversity. “This supposed ‘sportsmen’s legislation’ would actually jeopardize the health of hunters, promote needless lead poisoning of our wildlife, and prevent hunters, anglers and other members of the public from weighing in on decisions about how to manage 150 million acres of federal land and water.”

 

H.R. 3590 seeks to exempt toxic lead in ammunition and fishing equipment from regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act, the federal law that regulates toxic substances. The EPA is currently allowed to regulate or ban any chemical substance for a particular use, including the lead used in shot and bullets. Affordable, effective nontoxic alternatives exist for lead ammunition and lead sinkers for all hunting and fishing activities.

 

Spent lead from hunting is a widespread killer of more than 75 species of birds such as bald eagles, endangered condors, loons and swans, and nearly 50 mammals. More than 265 organizations in 40 states have been pressuring the EPA to enact federal rules requiring use of nontoxic bullets and shot for hunting and shooting sports.

 

“There are powerful reasons we banned toxic lead from gasoline, plumbing and paint — lead is a known neurotoxin that endangers the health of hunters and their families and painfully kills bald eagles and other wildlife,” said Snape.

 

H.R. 3590 would also exempt all national wildlife refuge management decisions from review and public disclosure under the National Environmental Policy Act and allow the import of polar bear “trophies” from Canada. The Republican-controlled House approved similar “Sportsmen’s Act” legislation in 2012 by a vote of 274-146, but the bill was stopped in the Senate.

 

Background

Despite being banned in 1992 for hunting waterfowl, spent lead shotgun pellets from other hunting uses continue to be frequently ingested by waterfowl. Many birds also consume lead-based fishing tackle lost in lakes and rivers, often with deadly consequences. Birds and animals are also poisoned when scavenging on carcasses containing lead-bullet fragments. More than 500 scientific papers have documented the dangers to wildlife from lead exposure. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service calculates that more than 14,000 tons of toxic lead shot is deposited in the environment each year in the United States by upland bird hunting alone.

 

Lead ammunition leaves fragments and numerous imperceptible, dust-sized particles that contaminate game meat far from a bullet track, causing significant health risks to people eating wild game. Recent scientific studies show that hunters have higher lead levels in their bloodstream, and more associated health problems, than the public at large. Some state health agencies have recalled venison donated to feed the hungry because of dangerous lead contamination from bullet fragments.

 

There are many alternatives to lead rifle bullets and shotgun pellets. More than a dozen manufacturers market hundreds of varieties and calibers of nonlead bullets and shot made of steel, copper and alloys of other metals, with satisfactory-to-superior ballistics. A recent study debunks claims that price and availability of nonlead ammunition could preclude switching to nontoxic rounds for hunting. Researchers found no major difference in the retail price of equivalent lead-free and lead-core ammunition for most popular calibers.

 

Hunters in areas with lead ammunition restrictions have transitioned to hunting with nontoxic bullets. There has been no decrease in game tags or hunting activity since state requirements for nonlead hunting went into effect in significant portions of Southern California in 2008 to protect condors from lead poisoning. California recently passed legislation to transition to lead-free hunting statewide by 2019.

 

Learn more about the Center’s Get the Lead Out campaign.

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Boulder police recover stolen bear during late-night forest rescue–those wacky cops!

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Boulder police have been investigating the theft of a large, stuffed bear from outside the Montbell store on Pearl Street and last night, Thursday, June 20, 2013, detectives and officers from the Target Crime Team unit rescued the bear from a campsite in the Roosevelt National Forest outside of Boulder.

Three male suspects, visiting from out of state, kidnapped the bear on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 just before 7 p.m. Although the Pearl Street Mall is generally crowded with people, no one was able to identify the culprits or their getaway car.

]Montbell Bear in Detective Section

Police didn’t have much to work with in the way of suspect information until last evening, when they found a Craig’s List personal ad showing a photo of a man hugging the bear outside the Montbell store. The ad asked the women who “may or may not have helped” steal the bear to contact the poster. Police contacted the suspect through the ad, and he confessed to stealing the bear with his friends.

The suspect told police that he and his accomplices (all are from out of state) took the bear camping in the Roosevelt National Forest, because they thought it would be “fun.” When they left their campsite to return home, they gifted the bear to another group of out-of-state campers they’d met over the past few days.

The suspect from the Craig’s List ad gave police directions to the campsite, and officers drove to the area last night. When they arrived they immediately located the bear — which was being held against his will–  in a nearby Jeep. Police interviewed the campers, and they were cooperative during the investigation.

Officers recovered the bear and gave him a special escort back to the Boulder Police Department, where he spent the night. (See attached photo).

The bear does not appear to be injured, but he was missing his fishing vest when police found him. The bear has not shared any information about what happened to him during the incident, so details are not available.

It will be up to the owners of the Montbell store to decide whether to pursue charges.

The bear will be returned this afternoon.

– CITY–

Boulder Travel Agency

Boulder Travel Agency

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Since 1947, the Boulder Travel Agency has provided travelers across the globe with the best care and creativity in travel planning. Planning the perfect vacation can be a challenge and that’s where the experts at Boulder Travel can help. They are a comprehensive leisure travel agency that gives you convenient access to exclusive travel offers and the highest level of service to get you the most for your vacation dollar.

Boulder Travel Agency1655 Folsom Street
Boulder, CO 80302

Phone: (303) 443-0380
Toll Free: (800) 336-0380

Hours:
Monday – Friday: 8am to 5pm

Email: info@bouldertravel.com
Website: http://www.bouldertravel.com/
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Boulder Army Store - Best of Outdoor Stores

Boulder Army Store – Best of Outdoor Stores

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The Boulder Army Store wins Boulder’s Best Outdoor Store award and Pat Long walks us through to show us some of the items that make them the best retail outdoor store in town.

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