Posts tagged New Mexico

Red River Memorial Day Motorcycle Rally

Leather Headquarters is going to the Red River Memorial Day Motorcycle Rally May 21-25, 2015

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Red River Memorial Day Motorcycle RallyRed River Memorial Day Scenic RoadMotorcycle Rally Map

On this Memorial Day weekend near Taos, New Mexico Leather Headquarters will be at the Red River Memorial Day Motorcycle Rally. May 21-25, 2015 – Get ready for the rumble as 20,000 bikers from all different backgrounds line Main Street for one crazy party. Live music can be found all over town, along with vendors carrying everything from leather and lace, to food and fun.

While you’re here, make sure you ride the Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway, an 83 mile loop through northern New Mexico’s most beautiful scenery, and stop by our booth to grab a nice leather jacket, some leather chaps, a new pair of boots or a sweet new helmet for your ride.

Find out more at http://www.redriver.org/memorial-day

Find more videos and news from Leather Headquarters here

Route 66 - Part 9 - New Mexico

Route 66 – Part 9 – New Mexico

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Route 66 – Part 9 – New Mexico – Continuing, Albuquerque, Route 66 Diner, Route 66 swap meet, Grants Museum, The Aztec Motel, plus Sanders Diner and Yellowstone AZ.

Route 66 - Part 10 - New Mexico

Route 66 – Part 10 – New Mexico

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Route 66 – Part 10 – New Mexico – Jann visits Albuquerque NM at Remember the Route 75 anniversary festival, The Aztec Motel in July of 2001, The Neon Car Tour, and Interview with Ned O’malley.

Route 66 - Part 11 - New Mexico

Route 66 – Part 11 – New Mexico

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Route 66 – Part 11 – New Mexico – Jann and Roger continue the road trip travels visiting Neon of Albuquerque, The Aztec Motel, Route 66 Diner, Rio Puerco Bridge, Cuber Trading, Budvile, Country Villa Cafe, Villa de Cubero, The Grants Uranium Museum, Route 66 swap meet.

Route 66 - Part 12 - New Mexico

Route 66 – Part 12 – New Mexico

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Route 66 – Part 12 – New Mexico – The Aztec Motor Court, Interview with Mohomad the owner and Phyllis Evans artist decorator, The Route 66 Diner in Albuquerque, Villa De Cubero at the Country Villa Cafe, Grants New Mexico at the Uranium Mine and interview with Donald Slamants at the Indian market and Bakers Auto Repair shop.

Route 66 - Part 13 - Santa Fe

Route 66 – Part 13 – Santa Fe

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Route 66 – Part 13 – Santa Fe – Jann visits Santa Fe New Mexico, interview with Mike Pitel, La Fonda Hotel and Inn of the Anasazi.

Route 66 - Part 14 - New Mexico and Arizona

Route 66 – Part 14 – New Mexico and Arizona

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Route 66 – Part 14 – New Mexico – Jann visits La Bajada Hill in New Mexico, Bernalillo, The Sirens Womens Motorcycle club in Albuquerque. Santa Rosa New Mexico and the Car Museum.

Route 66 - Part 21 - Arizona and California

Route 66 – Part 21 – Arizona and California

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Route 66 – Part 21 – Arizona & California – In this episode Jann and camera girl Janet continue a wacky and fun week on Route 66. Albuquerque, Dog House, Grants Pass, The Continental Divide NM, Gallop NM, The Petrified Forest and The Painted Desert AZ, The Creator and its museum, Meteor City, Mr. D’s Kingman AZ, Oatman AZ, and Los Angeles.

Route 66 - Part 22 - California

Route 66 – Part 22 – California

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Route 66 – Part 22 – California – Includes Tucumcari NM, Vega TX, Amarillo, Cadillac Ranch, China Town, Hollywood, Santa Monica, Venus Beach, and The Azusa Drive In.

Hot_Earth

Obama pulls plug on wolves life support

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Obama Administration Strips Wolf Protections Across Most of Lower 48 States

Plan Ends Prospects of Wolf Recovery in Southern Rockies, California, Northeast, Pacific Northwest

WASHINGTON— In a move questioned by some of the World’s leading wolf researchers, the Obama administration announced plans today to prematurely strip Endangered Species Act protections from gray wolves across most of the lower 48 states, abruptly ending one of America’s most important species recovery programs. The proposal concludes that wolf protection in the continental United States, in place since 1978, is no longer needed, even though there are fledgling populations in places like the Pacific Northwest whose survival hinges on continued federal protection.

Most wild wolves will lose federal protection. The sates have interest in protecting wolves--a key animal in ecosystem health.

Most wild wolves will lose
federal protection. The states have little or no interest in protecting wolves–a key animal in ecosystem health.

 

“This is like kicking a patient out of the hospital when they’re still attached to life-support,” said Noah Greenwald, endangered species director with the Center for Biological Diversity.  “Wolves cling to a sliver of their historic habitat in the lower 48 and now the Obama administration wants to arbitrarily declare victory and move on. They need to finish the job that Americans expect, not walk away the first chance they get. This proposal is a  national disgrace and our wildlife deserve better.”

Wolves today occupy just 5 percent of their historic habitat in the continental United States. Today’s proposal means that wolves will never fully reoccupy prime wolf habitat in the southern Rocky Mountains, California and Northeast, and will hinder ongoing recovery in the Pacific Northwest.

The proposal will hand wolf management over to state wildlife agencies across most of the country – a step that has meant widespread killing in recent years. Following removal of protections for wolves in the northern Rocky Mountains and western Great Lakes in 2011, states in those regions quickly enacted aggressive hunting and trapping seasons designed to drastically reduce wolf populations. In the northern Rocky Mountains more than 1,100 wolves have been killed since protections were removed; this year populations declined by 7 percent.

“By locking wolves out of prime habitat across most this country, this proposal perpetuates the global phenomena of eliminating predators that play hugely important roles in ecosystems,” said Greenwald. “Wolves are well documented to benefit a host of other wildlife from beavers and fish, to songbirds and pronghorn.”

In response to a petition from the Center for Biological Diversity, today’s proposal maintains protections for the Mexican gray wolf as a separate subspecies. Only 75 Mexican wolves roam a recovery area restricted to portions of Arizona and New Mexico. The population has not grown as expected because of a combination of illegal poaching and government mismanagement that requires wolves to be removed from the wild or killed when they leave the recovery area or depredate livestock.

wolf_and_plane

“It’s obvious that Mexican gray wolves continue to need protection and we’re glad they’re getting it,” said Greenwald. “But it is equally obvious that wolves in the Pacific Northwest, southern Rockies, California and Northeast also need continued protection.”

Press release–The Center for Biological Diversity is a national, nonprofit conservation organization with more than 500,000 members and online activists dedicated to the protection of endangered species and wild places.

 

 

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