Posts tagged economy

The Boulder Chamber of Commerce

Boulder Chamber interview with John Tayer

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President of the Boulder Chamber John Tayer, explains the Business Services, Advocacy and the Economic Vitality they provide in the city of Boulder. John talks about the members who join the Chamber and ways the Boulder Chamber can connect them others to help build their business, as well he explains some of the local policies the Chamber takes a role in developing in the community and some of the networking events the Chamber hosts where business voices can be shared with others. He talks with Boulder channel 1 CEO Jann Scott See more Boulder channel 1 videos on the Boulder Chamber Here . If you or your company would like a video like this  see Boulder channel 1 Advertising Agency Services

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CU-Boulder Leeds School Confident

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cu buildingColorado business leaders confidence remains positive and has increased slightly going into the second quarter of 2014, according to the most recent Leeds Business Confidence Index, or LBCI, released today by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.

The second quarter LBCI posted a reading of 61, an increase from 59.9 last quarter. Expectations measured positive — at 50 or higher — for all of the metrics measured by the index, which include the national economy, state economy, industry sales, industry profits, capital expenditures and hiring plans.

The across-the-board positive standings represent 10 consecutive quarters of positive expectations, according to the Leeds School’s Business Research Division, which conducts the LBCI — a report that’s now in its 10th year.

 

Source: CU Boulder

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CU report: Colorado economy to stay warm next year

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Positive, broad-based job growth forecast for Colorado in 2014, says CU Leeds School of Business Colorado will continue on the road to recovery and add a variety of jobs in 2014 across almost all business sectors following a positive year in 2013, according to economist Richard Wobbekind of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Wobbekind’s announcement is part of the 49th annual Colorado Business Economic Outlook Forum to be delivered Dec. 9 by the Business Research Division of the Leeds School and presented by Noble Energy. The comprehensive outlook report for 2014 features forecasts and trends for 13 business sectors prepared by more than 100 key business, government and industry professionals. “With Colorado’s skilled workforce, high-tech diversified economy, relatively low cost of doing business, global economic access and exceptional quality of life, the state is poised for long-term economic growth,” Wobbekind wrote in the outlook. Wobbekind is the executive director of the Leeds School’s Business Research Division. const jobs   Overall, the forecast calls for a gain of 61,300 jobs in 2014, compared with a gain of about 66,900 jobs this year. All sectors of the Colorado economy are predicted to grow in 2014 with the exception of the information sector, which includes publishing and telecommunications. Colorado is expected to be in the top five states for job growth in 2014 with workers added in both goods- and services-producing sectors. The strongest sector for projected job growth in Colorado in 2014 is the professional and business services sector, which is expected to add 14,200 jobs or grow by 3.8 percent. “Colorado has strategic advantages in the professional and business services sector given the highly educated workforce, innovative spirit and small business base that we have in the state,” said Wobbekind. “If national-level political and fiscal uncertainty subsides, we may see even stronger growth in this sector than what we’re currently projecting.” Other leading job growth sectors for 2014 include the construction sector, which is expected to add 11,000 jobs or grow by 8.7 percent; and the trade, transportation and utilities sector, which is expected to add 9,100 jobs or grow by 2.2 percent. Though it was one of the greatest casualties of the recession, the construction sector has exhibited strong growth in recent years in values, permits and employment, according to Wobbekind. Total value of construction is expected to reach the second highest level in the past decade, rising by 14.8 percent in 2014 with the largest increase due to residential construction. Total housing permits are expected to grow by 17.5 percent with gains in both single- and multifamily units. The trade, transportation and utilities sector is the largest provider of jobs in Colorado. It includes everything from wholesale and retail trade to a variety of transportation features such as Denver International Airport and gas pipelines, as well as utilities. DIA is expected to record more than 52 million passengers in 2014. Retail sales in the state are anticipated to rise by 5 percent in 2014, up from 4.2 percent growth in 2013. Colorado’s unemployment rate is expected to remain below 7 percent in 2014, which is comparatively better than the national unemployment rate. Commenting on the overall forecast, Wobbekind said, “After the deep recession we encountered as a state and a nation, it is really a relief to be reporting strong positive job growth in Colorado.” Risks to economic growth nationally include sequestration, the debt limit, government shutdown, Federal Reserve policy and health care reform, according to the outlook. Colorado’s population is the seventh fastest growing in the country by percentage and the ninth fastest growing in the country by number of residents. The state’s population is projected to grow by 1.7 percent to nearly 5.4 million people. To view the entire economic outlook for Colorado in 2014, including an overview of each of the state’s major economic sectors, visit http://leeds.colorado.edu/BRD. To follow the event on Twitter use #OutlookCO.

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CU: Colorado economy heating up next year

Positive, broad-based job growth forecast for Colorado in 2014, says CU Leeds School of Business Colorado will continue on the road to recovery and add a variety of jobs in 2014 across almost all business sectors following a positive year in 2013, according to economist Richard Wobbekind of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business. Wobbekind’s announcement is part of the 49th annual Colorado Business Economic Outlook Forum to be delivered Dec. 9 by the Business Research Division of the Leeds School and presented by Noble Energy.

The comprehensive outlook report for 2014 features forecasts and trends for 13 business sectors prepared by more than 100 key business, government and industry professionals. “With Colorado’s skilled workforce, high-tech diversified economy, relatively low cost of doing business, global economic access and exceptional quality of life, the state is poised for long-term economic growth,” Wobbekind wrote in the outlook. Wobbekind is the executive director of the Leeds School’s Business Research Division.

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Overall, the forecast calls for a gain of 61,300 jobs in 2014, compared with a gain of about 66,900 jobs this year. All sectors of the Colorado economy are predicted to grow in 2014 with the exception of the information sector, which includes publishing and telecommunications. Colorado is expected to be in the top five states for job growth in 2014 with workers added in both goods- and services-producing sectors. The strongest sector for projected job growth in Colorado in 2014 is the professional and business services sector, which is expected to add 14,200 jobs or grow by 3.8 percent. “Colorado has strategic advantages in the professional and business services sector given the highly educated workforce, innovative spirit and small business base that we have in the state,” said Wobbekind. “If national-level political and fiscal uncertainty subsides, we may see even stronger growth in this sector than what we’re currently projecting.”

Other leading job growth sectors for 2014 include the construction sector, which is expected to add 11,000 jobs or grow by 8.7 percent; and the trade, transportation and utilities sector, which is expected to add 9,100 jobs or grow by 2.2 percent. Though it was one of the greatest casualties of the recession, the construction sector has exhibited strong growth in recent years in values, permits and employment, according to Wobbekind. Total value of construction is expected to reach the second highest level in the past decade, rising by 14.8 percent in 2014 with the largest increase due to residential construction. Total housing permits are expected to grow by 17.5 percent with gains in both single- and multifamily units. The trade, transportation and utilities sector is the largest provider of jobs in Colorado. It includes everything from wholesale and retail trade to a variety of transportation features such as Denver International Airport and gas pipelines, as well as utilities. DIA is expected to record more than 52 million passengers in 2014.

Retail sales in the state are anticipated to rise by 5 percent in 2014, up from 4.2 percent growth in 2013. Colorado’s unemployment rate is expected to remain below 7 percent in 2014, which is comparatively better than the national unemployment rate. Commenting on the overall forecast, Wobbekind said, “After the deep recession we encountered as a state and a nation, it is really a relief to be reporting strong positive job growth in Colorado.” Risks to economic growth nationally include sequestration, the debt limit, government shutdown, Federal Reserve policy and health care reform, according to the outlook. Colorado’s population is the seventh fastest growing in the country by percentage and the ninth fastest growing in the country by number of residents. The state’s population is projected to grow by 1.7 percent to nearly 5.4 million people. To view the entire economic outlook for Colorado in 2014, including an overview of each of the state’s major economic sectors, visit http://leeds.colorado.edu/BRD. To follow the event on Twitter use #OutlookCO.

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Google Hosts Free Event to Help Colorado Small Businesses Get Online

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U.S. Rep. Polis and Boulder Mayor Appelbaum to kick off event, business owners to launch free websites with step-by-step guidance from Google staff

Boulder, CO, August 13, 2013 – Google, along with U.S. Rep. Jared Polis and Boulder Mayor Matt Appelbaum will launch its Colorado Get Your Business Online program in Boulder.

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Since the statewide program began in 2012, more than 1,300 Colorado businesses have taken advantage of free Google tools to launch a website and grow their businesses online. However, 63% of Colorado small businesses still don’t have a website while 97% of internet users go online to find local products and services. The August 13th workshop features step-by-step guidance for business owners to learn how to build their own website, as well as attend sessions devoted to promoting their business online, all offered free of charge.

 

Also at the event, Google will present the City of Boulder with an inaugural award recognizing Colorado’s strongest online business community as a digital capital of America – a city that embraces the power of the web to grow its businesses and fuel its economy.

Local elected officials and businesses will be available to discuss the program with media.

WHATGoogle Get Your Business Online event and workshop for Colorado businesses

WHO: U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, Boulder Mayor Matt Appelbaum, local business owners and Google trainers, designers and website developers

WHENNews conference: Tuesday, August 13th from 10:00 to 10:20 a.m. Workshops run 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

WHERE: Rembrandt Yard, 1301 Spruce Street, Boulder, CO 80301

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Robert Reich Interview – Boulder Denver New Tech Meetup

Robert Reich Interview – Boulder Denver New Tech Meetup

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Jann Scott Interviews Boulder-Denver New Tech Meetup founder Robert Reich and we learn about Robert has created a great place for New Tech companies in Colorado to meet and share their ideas and become apart of the growing community of multimedia in the area and what it means to be a Start Up company and a Small Business.

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Colorado business confidence remains positive going into first quarter, says CU Leeds School index

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Colorado business leaders’ optimism is modest going into the first quarter of 2013 with uncertainty surrounding the country’s political and economic environments, according to the most recent quarterly Leeds Business Confidence Index, or LBCI, released today by the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.

For the first quarter of 2013 the LBCI, conducted by the Leeds School’s Business Research Division, posted an overall confidence reading of 51.3, down slightly from 51.6 in the fourth quarter of 2012. A reading greater than the neutral mark of 50 indicates positive expectations and one less than 50 indicates negative expectations going forwardcat face

Business leaders are optimistic about all of the metrics of the quarterly index except for the national economy and industry hiring plans. The other categories measured include the state economy, industry sales, industry profits and capital expenditures.

“For months, drags on the national economy have included the European debt crisis, the slow rate of employment growth and the resolution of the federal debt crisis,” said economist Richard Wobbekind, executive director of the Business Research Division. “While Colorado business leaders have stronger confidence in the local economy than the national economy, they’re proceeding very cautiously.”
Confidence in the state economy, which is at 55.5 points for the first quarter of 2013, outstrips that of the national economy, which posted a reading of 47. The outpacing of confidence in Colorado’s economy compared to the national economy is a 30-quarter trend, based on LBCI results.

Business leaders’ sales expectations for the first quarter rose to 54.4, up from 53.2 last quarter, and are buoyed by 44.1 percent of LBCI respondents who anticipate an increase in the first quarter versus only 25.2 percent who predict a decline. Meanwhile, leaders’ profit expectations fell to 51.6, down from 52.2 for the last quarter of 2012.

Hiring expectations have slipped into negative territory at 49.3, down from 51 in the last quarter of 2012, while capital expenditures remain close to neutral at 50.1.

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CU Leeds School of Business: Positive, broad-based job growth forecast for Colorado in 2013

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Colorado will continue on the road to recovery and add a variety of jobs in 2013 across almost all business sectors following a positive year in 2012, according to economist Richard Wobbekind of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Leeds School of Business.

Wobbekind’s announcement is part of the 48th annual Colorado Business Economic Outlook Forum presented Dec. 3 by the Business Research Division of the Leeds School.

The comprehensive outlook for 2013 features forecasts and trends for 13 business sectors prepared by more than 100 key business, government and industry professionals.

“For the state, we see a very positive environment for 2013,” said Wobbekind, executive director of the Business Research Division. “We’re seeing a wide array of jobs being added and they’re diversifying our state economy.”

Overall, the forecast calls for a gain of 42,100 jobs in 2013, compared with a gain of about 47,900 jobs this year. All sectors of the Colorado economy are predicted to grow in 2013 with the exception of the information sector, which includes publishing and telecommunications.

When comparing the Leeds School forecast to employment outlooks for other states, Colorado is expected to be in the top 10 states for job growth in 2013 and perhaps in the top six or seven, according to Wobbekind.

Even with positive job growth projected for the state, Wobbekind said uncertainty from national and international factors will play a role in slowing growth during the first and second quarters of 2013. More momentum will occur in the second half of the year.

“Resolution of the so-called fiscal cliff and the resolution of the European debt crisis will have impacts on the national economy and that will filter down to the state level,” said Wobbekind. “Once that uncertainty gets resolved, we then expect business investments to start flowing again and consumers to start making decisions based on a known environment. We think the recovery will be quite a bit smoother after that.”

The strongest sector for projected job growth in Colorado in 2013 is the educational and health services sector. The sector is expected to add 7,600 jobs in 2013.

In addition, other leading growth sectors for 2013 include the professional and business services sector with 7,400 jobs added and leisure and hospitality with 5,000 workers added, mostly in the areas of accommodation and food services.

The trade, transportation and utilities sector is the largest provider of jobs in Colorado. It includes everything from wholesale and retail trade to a variety of transportation features such as the Denver International Airport and gas pipelines, as well as utilities. The sector is expected to grow 1.4 percent in 2013 with the addition of 5,600 jobs.

The construction sector is expected to grow by 6,300 jobs in 2013 — up from a 2,800-job increase this year — and produce $12.6 billion in total value of construction. While the biggest surprise in the sector is the demand for infrastructure work, the number of new multifamily units built is a contributing factor to the increase, among others.

Commenting on the overall forecast, Wobbekind said, “It’s great to be giving positive news to people year after year. Confidence levels nationally are at their highest levels in five years. We’re really starting to see a lot more optimism on the part of the average person on the street about the future.”

Colorado’s unemployment rate is expected to decrease from 8 percent in 2012 to 7.4 percent in 2013, which is comparatively better than the national unemployment rate.

Colorado’s population grew by 1.4 percent, or 71,000 people, in 2012 and is projected to increase by 1.5 percent, or 77,500 people, in 2013. Roughly half of the increase will derive from net migration, or the increase of people moving to the state.

To view the entire economic outlook for Colorado in 2013, including an overview of each of the state’s major economic sectors, visit http://leeds.colorado.edu/BRD and click on the Colorado Business Economic Outlook 2013 icon.

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I Voted

Vote Obama – Government Oversight Critical By Scott Hatfield

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Vote Obama – Government Oversight of Corporate Abuse Critical to Make Americans Safe
By Scott Hatfield

With serious differences on corporate and government accountability and the concentration of wealth and power at the very top, folks should be feeling compelled to vote for Obama. Here in Boulder, most people will vote and vote democratic. However, there are some compelling reasons to vote for Obama if you are a Green, moderate Republican, unmotivated, or middle of the road.
With Ruth Bader Ginsburg planning to retire in 2015, her replacement by a far right corporatist would have serious consequences for decades on a wide variety of issues. Whether it is a woman’s right to choose, global warming, campaign finance, toxic waste, voter intimidation and suppression, public lands extraction, public health, or civil liberties, cementing right wing control would be a blow to the rights of all Americans. With the appointments of Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayer, the President has shown appropriate and reasonable judgment.
Government oversight and regulation of large powerful corporations plays a critical role in protecting the safety of the American people. For a wide variety of issues, the Republicans keep repeating that regulations are the problem. We need to act to prevent a corporate free for all. The top issue on regulations has been health care reform. Privatizing Medicare through a voucher system while removing oversight would raise premiums while unleashing corporate profits at the expense of the sick and wounded. Health care needs to be about healing people rather than absolving accountability for the powerful. The argument against Obamacare is the same as the argument against oversight of toxic material. With cancer overtaking heart disease as the nation’s top killer, the purpose of collusion between these disparate but connected industries reflects a self perpetuating cycle of disease as a top priority, not safety in the homeland. A lack of regard for corporate accountability pervades the Romney agenda across the board on environmental issues so important to Boulder and the quality of life everywhere be it water (#1 in CO), CO2, endangered species, public lands extraction, exploding chemical plants, or wilderness.
Most of the stated opposition to corporate accountability boils down to the economic burden on the rich and powerful corporate elite. This is especially glaring in the financial and economic sectors. For Romney, it is not a matter of the economy; it is a matter of whose economy. Republicans are all too happy to see larger and larger proportions of Americans living in poverty and despair. Again a complete lack of accountability is the mantra for the financial sector abuses that got us into this economic quagmire in the first place. Meaningful reform will not occur without oversight. Too many people have lost their homes, retirement funds, and jobs. The Wall Street giants have made their intentions clear. A regulatory regime on these bloated bankers is critical for an economy that provides a level playing field. We need a financial system capable of promoting the interests of a majority of Americans, not just those at the top. “Drill, baby, drill!’ will not get us out of the mess that Wall Street created, just ask the Frankenstorm Sandy.
Across the board, replacing any meaningful policy analysis with sound bites about burdensome regulations on large corporations will not solve our nation’s problems. If you want to get out of a hole, stop digging. While fighting multiple wars abroad under the guise of keeping the American people safe, the serious erosion of corporate responsibility at home on issues such as health care, toxic exposure and the environment, and the financial sector will do more to damage homeland safety than enemies abroad could ever hope for.

Scott Hatfield has been a member of the Central Committee of the Colorado Democratic Party and the Executive Committee of the Boulder Democratic Party since 1996.

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Boulder city budget on the uptick

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Recommended city budget provides limited and targeted growth in 2013

 

On Sept. 11, Boulder City Council will begin considering a proposed 2013 budget that supports master plans accepted by council in 2012, restores partial funding for police and firefighter training, and continues funding for existing community programs and services.

 

City officials said that while the local economy is improving slowly, the city’s General Fund revenues will see only modest increases in 2013. As a result, City Manager Jane Brautigam recommends continuing the conservative approach initiated during the economic downturn; limited new funding will be allocated to programs supporting the highest community priorities next year, including economic vitality initiatives and significant investments in Boulder’s public facilities and infrastructure made possible by voters in November 2011.

 

The $256 million Recommended Budget includes $33 million in capital improvement plan spending – an increase of $10 million over 2012 levels.

 

“Boulder is in a stable financial position, and the conservative approach taken over the past few years has helped the city to become more efficient and effective with public dollars,” said Brautigam. “Our focus on cost recovery, restructuring city functions and not using one-time revenues to pay for on-going expenses has enabled Boulder to reduce the projected $135 million annual structural gap identified by the Blue Ribbon Commission in 2008 to $75 million annually by 2030.

 

“Boulder’s guiding principles of separating one-time revenues from ongoing expenditures also emphasizes the need to accurately project future one-time costs in order to carefully save over several years in preparation for those expenditures to avoid impacting Boulder’s base budget,” added Brautigam. “Because the city purposely saved for the future, we are prepared to pay as we go for planned one-time expenditures without negative impacts to the 2013 base budget.”

The 2012 Boulder City Council is keeping an eye on revenue and expenses.

 

The recommended base budget reflects a 2 percent increase in base budget expenditures compared to the 2012 approved budget. Boulder saved an additional $16 million outside of that base budget to pay for one-time expenses that will be incurred next year. Most of that amount consists of funding for important transportation projects leveraged by the city using state and federal sources; a once every 11- to 12-year pay-period liability associated with Boulder’s biweekly pay system, and expenditures for Boulder’s Energy Future that are now included in the city’s budget document to reflect revenues approved by the voters in November 2011.

 

In addition to the continued long-term emphasis to stabilize revenues and expenditures, the Recommended Budget addresses community and council priorities with a major emphasis in the following areas:

  • Restore non-personnel funding for police and firefighter training that was reduced during the economic downturn;
  • Provide additional resources for Boulder’s Energy Future, the Civic Area Master Plan and adding a resource officer for homelessness initiatives;
  • Carry out steps needed to implement master plans and department assessments, some of which began in the 2012 budget;
  • Continue and strengthen the commitment to economic sustainability; and
  • Boost the capacity of the city to renew its infrastructure and invest in technology.

 

The Recommended Budget provides for targeted growth in priority programs, adding one standard full-time equivalent (FTE) employee and 5.5 fixed-term FTEs in the General Fund to address these community initiatives.

 

Council is scheduled to begin studying the city manager’s 2013 recommended budget at its Tuesday, Sept. 11, study session. The study session will be aired live on Channel 8.

 

City Manager’s 2013 Recommended Budget is available online.

 

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